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Shares 136 Do you see air bubbles shooting out of the return jets in your swimming pool? It’s a very common problem (especially when you open your pool in the spring), and one that can be easily solved with a few troubleshooting tips. Air Bubbles in Pool? Why This Happenings Commonly, the air is coming from the suction side of your swimming pool this means anything before the water enters the filter. There are three places you can check to see if air is getting into your system. 1.

The Skimmer(s) Check the water level. If your pool doesn’t have enough water, your skimmer(s) might be pulling in air. Be sure that the water level is in the middle of your skimmer’s opening.

Here’s an illustration depicting where your water level should be: Check the skimmer basket. Make sure your skimmer baskets are not damaged and seated properly to ensure good water suction. Check the weir. The weir (or skimmer flap) is the door that “flaps” in front of your skimmer it’s there to trap large debris from escaping back into your pool and to regulate water flow into your skimmer. Sometimes it can get jammed, so make sure it’s freely moving back and forth.

If you don’t have a skimmer weir, I would recommended getting one, although it’s not the end of the world if you don’t have one. 2. The Pump Check the pump lid. First off, if the lid is cracked, that’s the problem right there, however, the most common issue has to do with the lid’s o-ring. Check the lid o-ring. Turn the pump off, remove the lid, and check the o-ring for cracks.

Just bend the o-ring between your fingers around the whole o-ring to check for any signs of cracking. If it looks like your o-ring is splitting or dry-rotted, you need to replace the o-ring. If there are no signs of cracking, that’s a good thing. However, I would recommend using a Teflon-based o-ring lube to create a better seal. MSD 631.0 Super Structure Mailers, 6 ,1/2 x 3 ,1/8 x 1 List Price: $15.37 Price: $15.37 You Save: Use this on all the rubber o-rings around your swimming pool, including the pump lid, filter and other equipment.

Buy Now On Amazon Check the pump basket. Sometimes if your basket is cracked it won’t be seated correctly in the housing. Replace a cracked filter basket and make sure it’s cleaned (frequently) and properly seated so that the lid can be sealed correctly. Check the drain plugs. On the pump housing you should have a drain plug (maybe two).

Make sure the drain plugs are not leaking or loose. You can apply some Teflon tape (plumbers tape) to the drain plug threads for a tighter seal. 3.

The Union(s) Photo from SpaDepot.com If you have an inground pool, you might have some unions in your plumbing. Unions are threaded connectors between piping that will allow you to easily replace your filter equipment without having to cut any pipe. Inside the union, you should have yet another o-ring to check for damage. If it’s damaged, replace it. If it’s not, make sure the o-ring is properly seated inside the groove it belongs in. If the o-ring is not in its groove, it will not create a proper seal and allow air to get into your system.

You’re All Set! Hopefully these troubleshooting tips solve your air bubble problem. If not, you can share your story in the comments below and I will respond with some additional help. Happy Swimming! Learn How You Can Spend Less Time Cleaning and More Time Swimming We cut out all the fluff and confusion of pool maintenance and stripped it down to the bare bones in this easy-to-read illustrated digital guide.

Hi Matt, First off, great website especially for first time pool owners. You make life much easier with plenty of humor to help. I checked all three areas where air can get in my pipes and the all check ok. I even took some incense to see where air is getting sucked in. No luck there.

I fear that air is getting sucked in the pipes underground. Any more ideas that can help? Thanks again, Cameron Try spraying soapy water around your filter system and look for bubbling. If you really suspect it’s underground, you can call a local pool company to come over and do a pressure test for you.

That’s really the worst case scenario though. Great advice. In my case one of the drain plugs needed to be tightened. There are two drain plugs on my pump and the one closer to the suction side was sucking in air causing occasional random bubbles. Hey Matt. Great stuff.

But you left out what I beleive is the most common source of air bubbles. In my experience, it is usually the o-ring on the stem of the three way valve that adjusts between the skimmer and vac. I have a 20K gallons under ground pool with a fairly new Hayward pool pump, and motor. They have been working perfectly well until I had a contractor re-barb, and concrete a section of the Cool-deck last week. Now, whenever I turn the pump on it runs well for two minutes, then I start getting air bubbles that seem to come, and go, but I see them through the glass face of the pump motor.

I’m not loosing water, and I have not detected a single leak anywhere, but the bubbles are driving nuts. I have an in ground pool. I notice a lot of air bubbles coming from some of my return jets. I had a local pool company tech look at it and he told me that because my pool had originally been set up with a pool heater the air bubbles are normal.??? He said my return lines are smaller and if they were the larger lines used for non heated pools I would not notice the bubbles. Should I believe this or get another pool company?

I would say that as long as your pressure is good, then I wouldn’t worry about it. Air bubbles are a sign that your system isn’t tight. Meaning, there is air leaking in somewhere. This usually causes the pressure to drop. Thanks Matt.

My pressure is less than 8psi down from 16 psi. He said the gauge is no good. It’s only about a month old. Could it be plugged?

When I bleed the air from the system I get spitting from the air bleed (water and air). Ismail. The 2 plugs on your pump. One is in front of the pump Impellor.

it experiences a Vacuum- hence your air was entering there. The other plug is in the Impellor chamber.It experiences Pressure. If loose water will be pushed out. Thanks Matt ! good site. I have 2 return jets.

on one jet when I have the eyeball in the liner starts to float like water is getting behind the liner. when I remove the eyeball and only have straight pipe the liner seems fine. we’ve done pressure checks and everything cks good. any ideas? Since I had algaes my pool the return jets are blowing lots of bubbles.

There’s also lots of air in the pump visible. While cleaning out the algaes I noticed that when the pressure in the filter went up, it showed more bubbles and after cleaning the filter (and showing lower pressure) always reduces bubbles extremely. Yesterday I cleaned the filter and then I had no bubbles at all for 24 hours. Now I cleaned the filter again and the bubbles came back. Can the filter somehow cause bubbles?

Actually I was sure that bubbles can only come from the suction side and not from the return-side (where the filter is …). I’ve checked everything that is suspicious to cause bubbles already (water level, pump-lid, drainage valves, union and the whole pipe all the way till it goes into ground ….) and I’ve also re-lubricated all the o-rings. I’ve also tested against leaks along the pipes with smoke-sticks and plastic-foil wrapping around – but no hint. Could an underground leak actually suck so much air when covered by so much dirt and sand?

Also because of our pool isn’t losing any water and the bubbles on/off thing I don’t think it’s somewhere underground, but what else could cause these bubbles? It’s driving me crazy … Thanks for any help! If you use the smoke or soapy water method to try and find a suction leak and don’t see any indication of one with these methods, don’t give up. I had what looked like a pretty good size suction lead judging by the amount of air I was getting out of my return jets, but I could not find anything with the methods mentioned above. I even put o ring lubrication on the pump strainer basket pot cover, but still had the major problem. I was told all indications lead to a suction line leak under ground and I should call a professional.

Before I did that I decided to invest in a $3.50 tube of outdoor silicone sealer and try to seal the joints of the PVC in the suction line. I started from the pump out, and as I put the sealer around the joint going into the suction end of the pump, like magic I watched the air under the clear pump strainer pot cover disappear. Problem solved. It doesn’t take much of a leak to create a huge bubble problem and in my case, it was so small none of the common indicating solutions gave the leak away. Super late on this…Make sure your pump is running when you open the cover. I struggled with this for two years before I read that the pump should remain on to alleviate suction.

OMG, what a difference. As soon as the lid is “cracked” a bit and some of the pressure is off, I turn off the pump. The lid comes off SO EASILY! I have completed all the suggested test for air getting into my in ground pool.

I have a Hayward Super Pump II. The smoke from incense shows air entering in the motor behind the motor mounting plate. Is this normal?

Most Popular How to Get Rid of Pool Algae How to Fix Cloudy Pool Water How to Open an Above Ground Pool in 10 Steps How to Open an Inground Pool in 10 Steps 10 Best Robotic Pool Cleaners Basic Pool Chemistry 101 Shares 136 Do you see air bubbles shooting out of the return jets in your swimming pool? It’s a very common problem (especially when you open your pool in the spring), and one that can be easily solved with a few troubleshooting tips. Air Bubbles in Pool? Why This Happenings Commonly, the air is coming from the suction side of your swimming pool this means anything before the water enters the filter. There are three places you can check to see if air is getting into your system.

1. The Skimmer(s) Check the water level. If your pool doesn’t have enough water, your skimmer(s) might be pulling in air.

Be sure that the water level is in the middle of your skimmer’s opening. Here’s an illustration depicting where your water level should be: Check the skimmer basket. Make sure your skimmer baskets are not damaged and seated properly to ensure good water suction. Check the weir. The weir (or skimmer flap) is the door that “flaps” in front of your skimmer it’s there to trap large debris from escaping back into your pool and to regulate water flow into your skimmer. Sometimes it can get jammed, so make sure it’s freely moving back and forth.

If you don’t have a skimmer weir, I would recommended getting one, although it’s not the end of the world if you don’t have one. 2. The Pump Check the pump lid. First off, if the lid is cracked, that’s the problem right there, however, the most common issue has to do with the lid’s o-ring.

Check the lid o-ring. Turn the pump off, remove the lid, and check the o-ring for cracks. Just bend the o-ring between your fingers around the whole o-ring to check for any signs of cracking. If it looks like your o-ring is splitting or dry-rotted, you need to replace the o-ring. If there are no signs of cracking, that’s a good thing. However, I would recommend using a Teflon-based o-ring lube to create a better seal.

MSD 631.0 Super Structure Mailers, 6 ,1/2 x 3 ,1/8 x 1 List Price: $15.37 Price: $15.37 You Save: Use this on all the rubber o-rings around your swimming pool, including the pump lid, filter and other equipment. Buy Now On Amazon Check the pump basket. Sometimes if your basket is cracked it won’t be seated correctly in the housing. Replace a cracked filter basket and make sure it’s cleaned (frequently) and properly seated so that the lid can be sealed correctly. Check the drain plugs. On the pump housing you should have a drain plug (maybe two).

Make sure the drain plugs are not leaking or loose. You can apply some Teflon tape (plumbers tape) to the drain plug threads for a tighter seal. 3. The Union(s) Photo from SpaDepot.com If you have an inground pool, you might have some unions in your plumbing. Unions are threaded connectors between piping that will allow you to easily replace your filter equipment without having to cut any pipe. Inside the union, you should have yet another o-ring to check for damage.

If it’s damaged, replace it. If it’s not, make sure the o-ring is properly seated inside the groove it belongs in. If the o-ring is not in its groove, it will not create a proper seal and allow air to get into your system. You’re All Set!

Hopefully these troubleshooting tips solve your air bubble problem. If not, you can share your story in the comments below and I will respond with some additional help. Happy Swimming! Learn How You Can Spend Less Time Cleaning and More Time Swimming We cut out all the fluff and confusion of pool maintenance and stripped it down to the bare bones in this easy-to-read illustrated digital guide.

Hi Matt, First off, great website especially for first time pool owners. You make life much easier with plenty of humor to help. I checked all three areas where air can get in my pipes and the all check ok. I even took some incense to see where air is getting sucked in. No luck there. I fear that air is getting sucked in the pipes underground.

Any more ideas that can help? Thanks again, Cameron Try spraying soapy water around your filter system and look for bubbling. If you really suspect it’s underground, you can call a local pool company to come over and do a pressure test for you. That’s really the worst case scenario though.

Great advice. In my case one of the drain plugs needed to be tightened. There are two drain plugs on my pump and the one closer to the suction side was sucking in air causing occasional random bubbles. Hey Matt.

Great stuff. But you left out what I beleive is the most common source of air bubbles. In my experience, it is usually the o-ring on the stem of the three way valve that adjusts between the skimmer and vac.

I have a 20K gallons under ground pool with a fairly new Hayward pool pump, and motor. They have been working perfectly well until I had a contractor re-barb, and concrete a section of the Cool-deck last week. Now, whenever I turn the pump on it runs well for two minutes, then I start getting air bubbles that seem to come, and go, but I see them through the glass face of the pump motor. I’m not loosing water, and I have not detected a single leak anywhere, but the bubbles are driving nuts. I have an in ground pool.

I notice a lot of air bubbles coming from some of my return jets. I had a local pool company tech look at it and he told me that because my pool had originally been set up with a pool heater the air bubbles are normal.??? He said my return lines are smaller and if they were the larger lines used for non heated pools I would not notice the bubbles. Should I believe this or get another pool company?

I would say that as long as your pressure is good, then I wouldn’t worry about it. Air bubbles are a sign that your system isn’t tight. Meaning, there is air leaking in somewhere. This usually causes the pressure to drop.

Thanks Matt. My pressure is less than 8psi down from 16 psi. He said the gauge is no good. It’s only about a month old. Could it be plugged? When I bleed the air from the system I get spitting from the air bleed (water and air).

Ismail. The 2 plugs on your pump. One is in front of the pump Impellor. it experiences a Vacuum- hence your air was entering there. The other plug is in the Impellor chamber.It experiences Pressure. If loose water will be pushed out.

Thanks Matt ! good site. I have 2 return jets. on one jet when I have the eyeball in the liner starts to float like water is getting behind the liner. when I remove the eyeball and only have straight pipe the liner seems fine. we’ve done pressure checks and everything cks good.

any ideas? Since I had algaes my pool the return jets are blowing lots of bubbles. There’s also lots of air in the pump visible.

While cleaning out the algaes I noticed that when the pressure in the filter went up, it showed more bubbles and after cleaning the filter (and showing lower pressure) always reduces bubbles extremely. Yesterday I cleaned the filter and then I had no bubbles at all for 24 hours. Now I cleaned the filter again and the bubbles came back. Can the filter somehow cause bubbles?

Actually I was sure that bubbles can only come from the suction side and not from the return-side (where the filter is …). I’ve checked everything that is suspicious to cause bubbles already (water level, pump-lid, drainage valves, union and the whole pipe all the way till it goes into ground ….) and I’ve also re-lubricated all the o-rings. I’ve also tested against leaks along the pipes with smoke-sticks and plastic-foil wrapping around – but no hint. Could an underground leak actually suck so much air when covered by so much dirt and sand? Also because of our pool isn’t losing any water and the bubbles on/off thing I don’t think it’s somewhere underground, but what else could cause these bubbles?

It’s driving me crazy … Thanks for any help! If you use the smoke or soapy water method to try and find a suction leak and don’t see any indication of one with these methods, don’t give up. I had what looked like a pretty good size suction lead judging by the amount of air I was getting out of my return jets, but I could not find anything with the methods mentioned above. I even put o ring lubrication on the pump strainer basket pot cover, but still had the major problem.

I was told all indications lead to a suction line leak under ground and I should call a professional. Before I did that I decided to invest in a $3.50 tube of outdoor silicone sealer and try to seal the joints of the

How to Fix a Leather Purse Strap | warfieldfamily

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