Data encryption standard crack . HP TouchPad Needs 6 to 8 Weeks for Additional Shipments

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HP needs 6-8 weeks to ship additional TouchPads, according to a leaked email sent to customers. HP is prepping one last run for its defunct tablet. Hewlett-Packard will apparently need close to two months to start fulfilling backorders for the (temporarily) revived TouchPad tablet. It will take 6-8 weeks to build enough HP TouchPads to meet our current commitments, during which time your order will then ship from this stock with free ground shipping, read an email sent to customers and reprinted in a Sept. 7 posting on the Precentral.net blog. You will receive a shipping notification with a tracking number once your order has shipped.

HP originally acquired webOS as part of its takeover of Palm in 2010. The manufacturer originally had big plans for loading the operating system onto a variety of devices, including tablets, smartphones, desktops and laptops. However, sales of its TouchPad proved anemic, and HP made the decision to end the tablet s life after a mere six weeks on the market. In order to clear out inventory, the manufacturer sliced the starting price to $99, which sparked a surge of consumer interest. In the wake of that, HP made the decision to revive the line for a limited time. In addition, HP plans on dividing its webOS arm into two separate units reporting to different areas of the company, according to two leaked memos that have made their way onto the Web.

The webOS software assets will find their way into the arms, however welcoming, of its Office of Strategy and Technology. The other parts of the webOS corporate infrastructure, presumably including its hardware interests, will continue as part of the Personal Systems Group, which manufactures HP s PCs, and which will presumably be spun off into its own entity under the terms of the company s new strategy. We have decided that we ll be most effective in these efforts by having the teams in webOS software engineering, worldwide developer relations and webOS software product marketing join the Office of Strategy and Technology, Todd Bradley, executive vice president of HP s Personal Systems Group, wrote in an email circulated to the webOS developer team and also leaked onto Precentral.net. The remainder of the webOS team, under Stephen DeWitt, will continue to report into PSG.

According to at least one analyst, flooding the market with additional TouchPad devices could have significant benefits for HP going forward. A larger installed base of TouchPad and webOS devices should increase the value of webOS in a potential sale, Sterne Agee analyst Shaw Wu wrote in a research note widely circulated on Barron s and other financial Websites. We believe logical buyers may include Samsung Electronics, Research In Motion, HTC, Amazon.com, Facebook, Sony, Microsoft and others. Follow Nicholas Kolakowski on Twitter Nicholas Kolakowski is a staff editor at eWEEK, covering Microsoft and other companies in the enterprise space, as well as evolving technology such as tablet PCs. His work has appeared in The Washington Post, Playboy, WebMD, AARP the Magazine, AutoWeek, Washington City Paper, Trader Monthly, and Private Air. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

eWeek Editor s Pick News & Views Cloud Computing Mobile and Wireless Update Best of eWeek eWeek Sunday Brunch eCareers Smart Moves Enterprise Applications Topic Center Update Enterprise IT Advantage eWeek Whitepaper Spotlight eWeek Labs eWeek Enterprise Update eWeek Storage Report Industry Center Update : Finance Industry Center Update : Government Industry Center Update : Health Care Infrastructure Topic Center Update Linux & Open Source Topic Center Update Mid-Market Solutions Securing the Enterprise VoIP Topic Center Update What s Hot Now eWeekend IBM Aims Watson at Embodied Cognition Microsoft Advances Any Developer, Any App, Any Platform Strategy Google Will Tag Frequent Violators of Its Site Safety Standards Intel Lights Up the Sky With New Shooting Star Drone Old School Polling Methods Hid Trump s Popularity With Voters Resources PCs Phones Printers Ultrabooks Blogs Viruses Cameras Components Computer Accessories Consumer Advice Displays E-readers Flash Drives Graphics Cards Hard Drives Home Theater Input Devices Keyboards Laptop Accessories Mobile Networking Operating Systems Optical Drives Processors Servers Smartwatches Streaming Services Storage Tablets Windows The latest Snowden-supplied bombshell shook the technology world to its core on Thursday: The NSA can crack many of the encryption technologies in place today, using a mixture of backdoors baked into software at the government’s behest, a $250 million per year budget to encourage commercial software vendors to make its security “exploitable,” and sheer computer-cracking technological prowess. To some extent, it’s not surprising to hear that the U.S. spy agency is doing spy agency stuff but, given the recent surveillance revelations and the fact that other countries likely have similar capabilities, the news is certainly worrying. To make matters worse, it came just a day after Pew reported that 90 percent of Internet users have taken steps to avoid surveillance in some way. All is not lost, however.

While the stunning reports failed to name exactly which companies and encryption technologies have been compromised by the NSA, you can minimize the chances that your encrypted communications will be cracked by the government or anyone else. Read on. Embrace open source Now that we know that corporations or at least individuals in corporations have worked with the NSA to build backdoors into encryption technology, privacy buffs should give commercial encryption technology (such as Microsoft’s BitLocker) the hairy eye. NSA headquarters.

You’re better off using tools that employ open-source or public-domain encryption methods, as they need to work with every vendor’s software and, in the case of open-source encryption, can be scrutinized for potential security flaws. With that in mind, here are some tools worth checking out: Truecrypt for encrypting sensitive files, folders, and entire drives on your PC. GPG, an open-source implementation of the OpenPGP protocol used to encrypt email communications. Be sure to read up on why standard-compliant email messages can never truly be secure, though.

TAILS, a.k.a. The (Amnesic) Incognito Live System, a Linux distribution built with security and anonymity in mind. TAILS comes packed with numerous privacy and encryption tools baked in, including Tor, which allows you to browse the web (mostly) anonymously and access a Darknet of so-called “Hidden Services” that grant anonymity to both web servers and web browsers. Bruce Schneier a longtime security guru who has actually read the documents detailing the NSA’s encryption-busting methods recommends using Tor and Hidden Services to thwart NSA surveillance.

TAILS is meant to be used as a live CD, which means you can boot it from a disc or USB drive, and your data is wiped when you power off your system. Off-the-record messaging, or OTR, a cryptographic protocol for encrypting and authenticating instant-messaging communications. The protocol uses AES and SHA-1 standards and comes baked into TAILS and is recommended by Schneier even in the wake of the NSA revelations. Here’s a list of IM software that supports OTR. Proprietary encryption tools created overseas may may also be less likely to have installed NSA-friendly backdoors into their software. This morning, I received an email from Boxcryptor, the superb (and Germany-based) cloud-storage encryption tool, reassuring me that there is no way for the company to snoop on its customers, as it encrypts files using private RSA security keys stored only on users’ private PCs, then transmits the already-encrypted files using HTTPs.

Going further Beyond encryption, most of the advice in PCWorld’s How to protect your PC from Prism surveillance still applies. Note, however, that the New York Times report on the NSA’s crypto-cracking abilities suggest that VPN technology and the ever-popular SSL web protocol have been two encryption methods particularly targeted by the government. (Schneier suggests using TLS and IPsec whenever possible on the web-communication front.) Even so, using the tips in that article will make your browsing much more secure in general, not just the NSA or foreign governments. Also check out PCWorld’s guide to encrypting (almost) everything, which is chock full of handy-dandy encryption tips, though many rely on proprietary not open-source technology. While closed-source solutions may not protect against The Man and his super-encryption-cracking eyes, they’ll help keep everyone else out of your business.

PCWorld PCWorld helps you navigate the PC ecosystem to find the products you want and the advice you need to get the job done. About Us Contact Us Digital Edition Customer Service Gift Subscription Ad Choices Newsletters Privacy Policy RSS Terms of Service Agreement E-commerce Affiliate Relationships PCWorld CATEGORIES Business Laptops Mobile PC Hardware Printers Security Software Videos Windows IDG Network Sites Advertise Careers at IDG Creative Lab IDG Permissions IDG Consumer & SMB Knowledge Hub Macworld TechHive Resources PCs Phones Printers Ultrabooks Blogs Viruses Cameras Components Computer Accessories Consumer Advice Displays E-readers Flash Drives Graphics Cards Hard Drives Home Theater Input Devices Keyboards Laptop Accessories Mobile Networking Operating Systems Optical Drives Processors Servers Smartwatches Streaming Services Storage Tablets Windows The latest Snowden-supplied bombshell shook the technology world to its core on Thursday: The NSA can crack many of the encryption technologies in place today, using a mixture of backdoors baked into software at the government’s behest, a $250 million per year budget to encourage commercial software vendors to make its security “exploitable,” and sheer computer-cracking technological prowess. To some extent, it’s not surprising to hear that the U.S. spy agency is doing spy agency stuff but, given the recent surveillance revelations and the fact that other countries likely have similar capabilities, the news is certainly worrying. To make matters worse, it came just a day after Pew reported that 90 percent of Internet users have taken steps to avoid surveillance in some way. All is not lost, however.

While the stunning reports failed to name exactly which companies and encryption technologies have been compromised by the NSA, you can minimize the chances that your encrypted communications will be cracked by the government or anyone else. Read on. Embrace open source Now that we know that corporations or at least individuals in corporations have worked with the NSA to build backdoors into encryption technology, privacy buffs should give commercial encryption technology (such as Microsoft’s BitLocker) the hairy eye.

NSA headquarters. You’re better off using tools that employ open-source or public-domain encryption methods, as they need to work with every vendor’s software and, in the case of open-source encryption, can be scrutinized for potential security flaws. With that in mind, here are some tools worth checking out: Truecrypt for encrypting sensitive files, folders, and entire drives on your PC. GPG, an open-source implementation of the OpenPGP protocol used to encrypt email communications. Be sure to read up on why standard-compliant email messages can never truly be secure, though. TAILS, a.k.a.

The (Amnesic) Incognito Live System, a Linux distribution built with security and anonymity in mind. TAILS comes packed with numerous privacy and encryption tools baked in, including Tor, which allows you to browse the web (mostly) anonymously and access a Darknet of so-called “Hidden Services” that grant anonymity to both web servers and web browsers. Bruce Schneier a longtime security guru who has actually read the documents detailing the NSA’s encryption-busting methods recommends using Tor and Hidden Services to thwart NSA surveillance. TAILS is meant to be used as a live CD, which means you can boot it from a disc or USB drive, and your data is wiped when you power off your system. Off-the-record messaging, or OTR, a cryptographic protocol for encrypting and authenticating instant-messaging communications.

The protocol uses AES and SHA-1 standards and comes baked into TAILS and is recommended by Schneier even in the wake of the NSA revelations. Here’s a list of IM software that supports OTR. Proprietary encryption tools created overseas may may also be less likely to have installed NSA-friendly backdoors into their software. This morning, I received an email from Boxcryptor, the superb (and Germany-based) cloud-storage encryption tool, reassuring me that there is no way for the company to snoop on its customers, as it encrypts files using private RSA security keys stored only on users’ private PCs, then transmits the already-encrypted files using HTTPs. Going further Beyond encryption, most of the advice in PCWorld’s How to protect your PC from Prism surveillance still applies. Note, however, that the New York Times report on the NSA’s crypto-cracking abilities suggest that VPN technology and the ever-popular SSL web protocol have been two encryption methods particularly targeted by the government.

(Schneier suggests using TLS and IPsec whenever possible on the web-communication front.) Even so, using the tips in that article will make your browsing much more secure in general, not just the NSA or foreign governments. Also check out PCWorld’s guide to encrypting (almost) everything, which is chock full of handy-dandy encryption tips, though many rely on proprietary not open-source technology. While closed-source solutions may not protect against The Man and his super-encryption-cracking eyes, they’ll help keep everyone else out of your business. PCWorld PCWorld helps you navigate the PC ecosystem to find the products you want and the advice you need to get the job done.

About Us Contact Us Digital Edition Customer Service Gift Subscription Ad Choices Newsletters Privacy Policy RSS Terms of Service Agreement E-commerce Affiliate Relationships PCWorld CATEGORIES Business Laptops Mobile PC Hardware Printers Security Software Videos Windows IDG Network Sites Advertise Careers at IDG Creative Lab IDG Permissions IDG Consumer & SMB Knowledge Hub Macworld

Advanced Encryption Standard - Wikipedia

More Top Ten Reviews compares and contrasts the best file encryption software for PCs. 3.1. Secret Key Cryptography. With secret key cryptography, a single key is used for both encryption and decryption. As shown in Figure 1A, the sender uses the key. Data Encryption Standard (データ暗号化標準)、略してDES(デス、ディーイーエス)は、アメリカ合衆国の旧国家暗号規格.

Tutorial: How to set up WPA2 on your wireless network ...

More Prev; Random; Next | Permanent link to this comic: http://xkcd.com/538/ Image URL (for hotlinking/embedding): http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/security.png Everything You Want to Know about the Cryptography behind SSL Encryption Background. SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) is a standard security technology for establishing an. The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), also known as Rijndael (its original name), is a specification for the encryption of electronic data established by the U.S.

How Apple iOS encryption and data protection work

More Is there such a thing as totally secure encryption? And which technologies are commercially viable? Danny Bradbury explores approaches to transmitting information. The Advanced Encryption Standard is is a symmetric cipher based on the Rijandael block cipher that is currently the United States federal government standard. The Data Encryption Standard (DES, / ˌ d iː ˌ iː ˈ ɛ s / or / ˈ d ɛ z /) is a symmetric-key algorithm for the encryption of electronic data. Although now.

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